11) Is there still a double standard regarding sexual activitiy of boys versus girls? Do teenagers still talk in terms of "Nice girls" versus "malandi girls"? Why is there no male counterpart to a "malandi"?

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11) Is there still a double standard regarding sexual activitiy of boys versus girls? Do teenagers still talk in terms of "Nice girls" versus "malandi girls"? Why is there no male counterpart to a "malandi"?

Post  PACH YONGQUE (^___^) on Fri Feb 13, 2009 3:16 pm

11) Is there still a double standard regarding sexual activitiy of boys versus girls? Do teenagers still talk in terms of "Nice girls" versus "malandi girls"? Why is there no male counterpart to a "malandi"?

In my judgment, in a way, there still is a double standard regarding the sexual activity of boys versus girls. Most of the time these double standards apply to easily discernible traits: sex, race, creed, sexual orientation, party affiliation and so on. Double standards are not only reserved for big, important issues like sexual activities; smaller but still relevant topics are subject to society's skewed views as well. There always seems to be some kind of impartiality on how some people view gender as a marked standard of accepting and tolerating sexual activities. For example, research indicates that males are more aggressive than females largely because of the male sex hormone, testosterone. Thus, it greatly influences people in to the impression that it is perfectly normal for any guy to participate and engage in sexual activities. Today, there are still some notions existing about men being the “players”, and women, just being “nice”. I think every society has certain common beliefs regarding the ways each gender should behave. For example, women have traditionally been considered as more tender and sympathetic than men. Men have been regarded as more competitive and less emotional than women. Each of us had somehow received the informal but powerful impression of the roles that we are expected to perform as boys or girls and as men or women. As children, we grow with our families providing us informal lessons regarding masculinity and femininity. They encourage us to behave in ways they feel appropriate for a particular sex. In some researches, (Young people’s views on sex by Linda Measor 2000) girls suggested that reasons why boys engage in sex is somewhat different from the girls’ reasons for sexual activity. Girls read strong emotional content into sexual encounters and see it as an expression of emotional commitment within a relationship. Most girls see boys as interested in the simple physical pleasure, or because of its status-giving potential. For this reason, double standards remain. As a conclusion, I can say that these standards of particular judgments and injustices regarding sexual activities of boys and girls exist in a subjective way and may or may not exist depending on the person’s viewpoint.

As for teenagers, there still are some talks about being a “nice” or “malandi” girl. There is the view that it is not accepted that a girl will engage in early sexual activities. Before, the subjects about these activities are masked in giggles, blushes, and “dirty stories”. Today, however, sex is much more frequently discussed as a normal part of human life. It is highly evidenced by the newspapers and television reports on research into human sexuality and books and magazine articles discussing the pleasures and problems of sexual situations. Some teenagers still do talk about the way other girls do flirting, seduction, and engagement in sexual activities. I believe there is still the notion that girls should be more refined and polished in the way they act. Some teenagers consider girls who do not trail the norms as promiscuous. The term “malandi” in colloquial speech implicates something pertaining mostly to females because of the fact that there is a traditional view concerning females. Like previously stated, females are expected to act in a certain way thus they are subject to more disapproval. In an article by Robin Milhausen and Edward Herold in the Journal of Sex Research, 2001, it is said that "a man who is successful with many women is likely to be seen as just that--successful ... [whereas] a woman known to have 'success' with many men is ... likely to be known as a 'slut.'" This view, suggests that for men, sexual behavior brings praise and respect, whereas for women, identical sexual behavior brings derogation and disrepute. Thus, teenagers may consider someone as “malandi” with this typical explanation while commending the “nice girls”.

As for a male counterpart of “malandi”, there is little or no significance in using this term for guys because of the stigma that the reputation of a girl is based on sexual abstinence and restraint while for males it is the possession of “experience” or sexual profligacy and having active expression of their sexuality.


N.B.
This post is based on the opinion and views of the author. Related literatures are sited in some parts. Feel free to give your commentaries. Thank you!

Pachi Yongque
BSN III C

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PACH YONGQUE (^___^)

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