Can the mass media be used to promote responsible sexual behavior among youth?

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Can the mass media be used to promote responsible sexual behavior among youth?

Post  ilovejay on Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:11 am

Can the mass media be used to promote responsible sexual behavior among youth?
by Joseph Justin S. Francisco
The media seem impervious to change or influence, especially for the
average parent or pediatrician. Are there solutions?
Absolutely. Certainly, it is disconcerting that other Western countries have a
healthier attitude toward sex and sexuality than does the United States. For
example, a recent study of teens in the Netherlands, France, and Germany
concluded [59]:
In the countries studied, adolescents are valued, respected, and expected to act
responsibly. Equally important, most adults trust adolescents to make
responsible choices because they see young people as assets rather than
problems. That message is conveyed in the media, in school texts, and in health
care settings.
By contrast, American media tend to view teens as ‘‘hormones with legs.’’
On primetime programming, there is an extraordinary amount of sexual content,
but much of it is suggestive, rather than responsible. Meanwhile, the federal
government insists on funding abstinence-only programs (which do not seem
to work). The result is that American teenagers receive inadequate and inaccurate
information about sex and sexuality—especially birth control—which
leads to the United States having the highest teen pregnancy rate in the Western
world. This is occurring while American adults have made the adult porn
industry a $10 billion enterprise [60]. In fact, American adults spend more
money on adult entertainment than they do on sporting events, movies, or buying
music [60].
But there are solutions for health care providers, parents, teenagers, Hollywood,
and society as a whole. First, health care providers need to acquaint
themselves with some of the literature concerning media effects on adolescents.
The media transect virtually every public health concern that practitioners have
concerning adolescents—violence, sex, drugs, suicide, and obesity. Yet most
clinicians do not watch much television themselves, they do not frequent teenage
movies, and they do not watch MTV or listen to rap music. Understanding
the cultural milieu of today’s teenagers is absolutely crucial to being able to care
for them adequately. A recent study of the 209 accredited pediatric residency
training programs in the United States found that less than one third offer formal
training about media influences [61]. The American Academy of Pediatrics, the
Society for Adolescent Medicine, the American Medical Association, and other
health care organizations need to devote more of their continuing medical education
time to issues that involve media influence because the media have such a
major impact on so many contemporary health issues. Health care providers need
to learn to take media histories, especially when they are seeing a teenager with:
aggressive behavior in school, learning difficulties, obesity, depression or suicidal
ideation, or disordered eating.
Parents, too, need to be aware of what media their teenagers are using. Studies
show that parents’ views can override depictions in the media, but only if the
parent actually expresses an opinion and if the parent is watching the same TV
show or movie as the teen [7,14] Most parents are not aware of how much
time their children or teens are spending with various media; nearly half of the
students in a recent Boston survey reported that their parents set no limits on their
TV viewing [62]. Two national studies found that nearly two thirds of teenagers
have a TV set in their own bedroom
Teenagers would benefit greatly from healthier media. They also need to be
exposed to media education. A century ago, to be ‘‘literate’’ meant being able to
read and write. In the new millennium, being literate also means being able
to analyze and decode an amazing array of media [64]. Many other countries
incorporate media education into the normal school curriculum, however, in the
United States, only New Mexico specifically does so [65]. Media education has
the potential to ‘‘immunize’’ teens against harmful media effects. Several studies
confirm this [66–70]. It needs to be incorporated into every sex education and
health education curriculum.
Hollywood writers and producers need to recognize that they have become the
de facto sex educators for young people in America. As such, they need to take
greater responsibility for the sexual dialog and behavior that they depict,
particularly in programming that targets teens. Madison Avenue advertisers also
need to exercise greater care in the body types that they depict. Advertisers need
to avoid creating campaigns that are gratuitously provocative, suggestive, or
demeaning (Fig. 11).
Society, too, has lost sight of its responsibility in raising healthy, sexual adults.
School sex education programs have suffered greatly in the past decade; they
need to go beyond abstinence-only boundaries. Similarly, birth control advertising
needs to become mainstream, as it is in European countries. Pornography on
the Internet is a major problem, but it is one that has an easy solution: creation of
an XXX top-level domain for adult-oriented, sexually explicit material. A major
government panel reported this solution 2 years ago [23], but no one has talked
publicly about implementing it. Finally, more money needs to be spent on media
research (at the moment, only one private foundation—the Kaiser Family
Foundation—has a major interest in media).
http://www.caah.chw.edu.au/conference/papers/paper_02.pdf


From what I have learned from the article, for the media to be a tool for promoting sexual behavior among the youth; the health care provider; the parents; movie writers and producers more so the society must work together, must be constant and must understand the effects of media to them. The media is the tool for instilling negative sexual behaviors and for me can also be used as a tool for reversing its effect in so doing promoting responsible sexual behavior. It would be difficult to reverse the effects of media to the youth today. Proper guidance of the child’s interaction with media is important for it to be controlled. And if already has a substantial effect, it can be traced back to its source for a possible solution.

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Can the mass media be used to promote responsible sexual behavior among youth?

Post  Jaja Rosellon on Sun Feb 15, 2009 9:20 am

Personally, I do think that mass media can greatly affect the attitudes and behaviors of the adolescent toward the subject "sex." We all know that up until now there is much stigma and embarassment put to the said subject, however when children are by themselves the subject "sex" became a very good topic to to be talked about but we do not know. There is a very large scope that mass media can cover, that is why parents and primary caregivers should be cautious and very observant on the things their child are reading , klistening and watching. Because in mass media there is no explanation involved it's major purpose is to provide the pubic 'the information for them to be patronized' {product being endorsed/music/album/movie}. There should be someone to correct their ideas they have obtained from the different channels of mass media.

Let me share some of the researches I have made from the iternet that I think may reinforce that **Can the mass media be used to promote responsible sexual behavior among youth?** Very Happy

Impact of the Media on Adolescent Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors
S. Liliana Escobar-Chaves, DrPH*, Susan R. Tortolero, PhD*, Christine M. Markham, PhD*, Barbara J. Low, DrPH*, Patricia Eitel, PhD* and Patricia Thickstun, PhD

* Center for Health Promotion and Prevention Research, University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, Texas
Medical Institute for Sexual Health, Austin, Texas

Background. Adolescents in the United States are engaging in sexual activity at early ages and with multiple partners. The mass media have been shown to affect a broad range of adolescent health-related attitudes and behaviors including violence, eating disorders, and tobacco and alcohol use. One largely unexplored factor that may contribute to adolescents' sexual activity is their exposure to mass media.

Objective. We sought to determine of what is and is not known on a scientific basis of the effects of mass media on adolescent sexual attitudes and behaviors.

Method. We performed an extensive, systematic review of the relevant biomedical and social science literature and other sources on the sexual content of various mass media, the exposure of adolescents to that media, the effects of that exposure on the adolescents' sexual attitudes and behaviors, and ways to mitigate those effects. Inclusion criteria were: published in 1983–2004, inclusive; published in English; peer-reviewed (for effects) or otherwise authoritative (for content and exposure); and a study population of American adolescents 11 to 19 years old or comparable groups in other postindustrial English-speaking countries. Excluded from the study were populations drawn from college students.

Results. Although television is subject to ongoing tracking of its sexual content, other media are terra incognita. Data regarding adolescent exposure to various media are, for the most part, severely dated. Few studies have examined the effects of mass media on adolescent sexual attitudes and behaviors: only 12 of 2522 research-related documents (<1%) involving media and youth addressed effects, 10 of which were peer reviewed. None can serve as the grounding for evidence-based public policy. These studies are limited in their generalizability by their cross-sectional study designs, limited sampling designs, and small sample sizes. In addition, we do not know the long-term effectiveness of various social-cultural, technologic, and media approaches to minimizing that exposure (eg, V-Chips on television, Internet-filtering-software, parental supervision, rating systems) or minimizing the effects of that exposure (eg, media-literacy programs).

Conclusions. Research needs to include development of well-specified and robust research measures and methodologies; ongoing national surveillance of the sexual content of media and the exposure of various demographic subgroups of adolescents to that content; and longitudinal studies of the effects of that exposure on the sexual decision-making, attitudes, and behaviors of those subgroups. Additional specific research foci involve the success of various types of controls in limiting exposure and the mitigative effects of, for example, parental influence and best-practice media-literacy programs.

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Can the mass media be used to promote responsible sexual behavior among youth?

Post  eunice on Mon Feb 16, 2009 9:18 am

"The American Academy of Pediatrics, the Society for Adolescent Medicine, the American Medical Association, and other health care organizations need to devote more of their continuing medical education time to issues that involve media influence because the media have such a major impact on so many contemporary health issues." --
Can the mass media be used to promote responsible sexual behavior among youth? by Joseph Justin S. Francisco

In my opinion, the media (televison, radio, magazines and the internet most especially) are important sex educators today and will continue to be in the future. Therefore, efforts both to encourage the media to present a healthier view of sexuality and to create, promote and make accessible healthier sources of sexual information should continue. Most importantly, children should be armed with the values, morals and guidance from their parents they'll need to be able to create sexually healthy lives—despite what most of the media teach.


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mass media.

Post  jazer jamsen on Wed Feb 18, 2009 7:36 am

yes, definitely, the mass media is a sure and a powerful medium so as to be able to help bring about the sexual education, precaution and awareness among our younger generation. nowadays, a lot has been into "expose" about "sexual abuse" or "sexual trade" that's undeniably very rampant among our youths and we have a lot of tv programs tackling ideas on how to educate our teeners about "sex" in a most gentle manner, we also have talk shows and debate shows that could educate more our young learners on sexual behaviors. and I believe, with the parental guidance that is given to our youths, the media could really instill further into the minds of our younger generation the do's and don'ts of "sex" making them to be more cautious and aware of the rapid growth of this sexual activities. in my honest opinion, not only the younger viewers could benefit and be well-oreinted on this, but also, the adult and those concerned citizens who are provided with honest to goodness resourceful and enlightining information, so, they too could very well work hand in hand and interact with our younger generation.



--Like a Star @ heaven jaze.

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Can the mass media be used to promote responsible sexual behavior among youth?

Post  MasterClef on Wed Feb 18, 2009 9:48 am


Mass Media Influence
In the last 50 years the media influence has grown exponentially with the advance of technology, first there was the telegraph, then the radio, the newspaper, magazines, television and now the internet.

We live in a society that depends on information and communication to keep moving in the right direction and do our daily activities like work, entertainment, health care, education, personal relationships, traveling and anything else that we have to do.

A common person in the city usually wakes up checks the tv news or newspaper, goes to work, makes a few phone calls, eats with their family when possible and makes his decisions based on the information that he has either from their co workers, news, tv, friends, family, financial reports, etc.

What we need to be aware is that most of our decisions, beliefs and values are based on what we know for a fact, our assumptions and our own experience. In our work we usually know what we have to do based on our experience and studies, however on our daily lives we rely on the media to get the current news and facts about what is important and what we should be aware of.

We have put our trust on the media as an authority to give us news, entertainment and education. However, the influence of mass media on our kids, teenagers and society is so big that we should know how it really works.

http://hubpages.com/hub/Mass-Media-Influence-on-Society

(YES) As for my opinion, I really think that the mass media could be used in promoting responsible sexual behavior among the youth since it has an impact or influence among the youth nowadays specially with regards to their decision making. I believe that it could be used as an eye opener regarding sexual behavior to show the youth the possible consequences that they might encounter based on their sexual behavior.

-Jezza Santos-

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Can the mass media be used to promote responsible sexual behavio among the youth?

Post  MasterClef on Wed Feb 18, 2009 9:53 am

In addition:

The media makes billions of dollars with the advertising they sell and that we are exposed to. We buy what we are told to be good, after seeing thousands of advertisings we make our buying decisions based on what we saw on Tv, newspapers or magazines to be a product we can trust and also based on what everyone else that we know is buying and their decision are also base don the media.

These are the effects of mass media in teenagers, they buy what they see on Tv, what their favorite celebrity advertise and what is acceptable by society based on the fashion that the media has imposed them.

There are some positive and negative influences in young people.

Here is a positive influence example, if there is a sport that is getting a lot of attention by the media and gains popularity among your friends and society, you will more likely want to practice the sport and be cool with all your friends. The result is that you will have fun with your friends and be more healthy because of the exercise your are doing.

However a negative influence in teenagers is the use of cigars by celebrity movie stars, the constant exposure of sex images, the excessive images of violence and exposure to thousands of junk food ads.

Young people are in a stage of life where they want to be accepted by their peers, they want to be loved and be successful. The media creates the ideal image of a beautiful men and women and tells you what are the characteristics of a successful person, you can see it in movies and tv. Its a subliminal way to tell you that if you are not like them you are not cool yet so its time to buy the stuff they buy and look like they look.

Another negative influence in teenagers that has grown over the last years are anorexia and obesity. There are millions of adolescents fighting obesity, but at the same time they are exposed to thousands of advertisements of junk food, while the ideas image of a successful person is told to be thin and wealthy.

http://hubpages.com/hub/Mass-Media-Influence-on-Society

-Jezza Santos-

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