9) Is it possible to tell children too much about sex when they ask questions? Should all questions be answered or are there some things that children should not be told until they are older? Provide a sample outline of what you think should be taught at

Go down

9) Is it possible to tell children too much about sex when they ask questions? Should all questions be answered or are there some things that children should not be told until they are older? Provide a sample outline of what you think should be taught at

Post  mobile2712 on Fri Feb 13, 2009 2:18 pm

9) Is it possible to tell children too much about sex when they ask questions? Should all questions be answered or are there some things that children should not be told until they are older? Provide a sample outline of what you think should be taught at certain age levels.

Talking to your kids about sex no. 62; updated may 2005 (american academy of child and adolescent psychiatry)
Talking to your children about love, intimacy, and sex is an important part of parenting. Parents can be very helpful by creating a comfortable atmosphere in which to talk to their children about these issues. However, many parents avoid or postpone the discussion. Each year about one million teenage girls become pregnant in the United States and three million teens get a sexually transmitted disease. Children and adolescents need input and guidance from parents to help them make healthy and appropriate decisions regarding their sexual behavior since they can be confused and overstimulated by what they see and hear. Information about sex obtained by children from the Internet can often be inaccurate and/or inappropriate.
Talking about sex may be uncomfortable for both parents and children. Parents should respond to the needs and curiosity level of their individual child, offering no more or less information than their child is asking for and is able to understand. Getting advice from a clergyman, pediatrician, family physician, or other health professional may be helpful. Books that use illustrations or diagrams may aid communication and understanding.
Children have different levels of curiosity and understanding depending upon their age and level of maturity. As children grow older, they will often ask for more details about sex. Many children have their own words for body parts. It is important to find out words they know and are comfortable with to make talking with them easier. A 5-year-old may be happy with the simple answer that babies come from a seed that grows in a special place inside the mother. Dad helps when his seed combines with mom's seed which causes the baby to start to grow. An 8-year-old may want to know how dad's seed gets to mom's seed. Parents may want to talk about dad's seed (or sperm) coming from his penis and combining with mom's seed (or egg) in her uterus. Then the baby grows in the safety of mom's uterus for nine months until it is strong enough to be born. An 11-year-old may want to know even more and parents can help by talking about how a man and woman fall in love and then may decide to have sex.

(Excerpts from the article from http://www.avert.org/sexedu.htm)

Young people get information about sex and sexuality from a wide range of sources including each other, through the media including advertising, television and magazines, as well as leaflets, books and websites which are intended to be sources of information about sex and sexuality. Some of this will be accurate and some inaccurate. Providing information through sex education is therefore about finding out what young people already know and adding to their existing knowledge and correcting any misinformation they may have. It is important to provide information which corrects mistaken beliefs. Without correct information young people can put themselves at greater risk.
Sex education that works starts early, before young people reach puberty, and before they have developed established patterns of behaviour. The precise age at which information should be provided depends on the physical, emotional and intellectual development of the young people as well as their level of understanding.
It is important not to delay providing information to young people but to begin when they are young. Providing basic information provides the foundation on which more complex knowledge is built up over time. This also means that sex education has to be sustained. For example, when they are very young, children can be informed about how people grow and change over time, and how babies become children and then adults, and this provides the basis on which they understand more detailed information about puberty provided in the pre-teenage years. They can also when they are young, be provided with information about viruses and germs that attack the body. This provides the basis for talking to them later about infections that can be caught through sexual contact.

*** According to this text, it is important for parents to provide information and answer the questions of children regarding sex because it is supposed to correct their mistaken beliefs; prevent confusion and wrong actions. Therefore, when a child asks, the parent should answer in all honesty and precision, because it will be the child’s source of knowledge and belief. Providing basic information provides the foundation on which more complex knowledge is built up over time.
However, the child’s physical, emotional and intellectual development should also be considered. A 5 year old child asking about sex may still not understand some explanation. Nevertheless, providing the only truthful basic information that he is capable of grasping should be provided. In the long run, this can be his basis for his next question after some time. By then when as he has slightly grown, more information may now be added bit by bit. (Providing basic information provides the foundation on which more complex knowledge is built up over time.)
For example, when they are very young, children can be informed about how people grow and change over time, and how babies become children and then adults, and this provides the basis on which they understand more detailed information about puberty provided in the pre-teenage years. They can also when they are young, be provided with information about viruses and germs that attack the body. This provides the basis for talking to them later about infections that can be caught through sexual contact.
A 5-year-old may be happy with the simple answer that babies come from a seed that grows in a special place inside the mother. Dad helps when his seed combines with mom's seed which causes the baby to start to grow. An 8-year-old may want to know how dad's seed gets to mom's seed. Parents may want to talk about dad's seed (or sperm) coming from his penis and combining with mom's seed (or egg) in her uterus. Then the baby grows in the safety of mom's uterus for nine months until it is strong enough to be born. An 11-year-old may want to know even more and parents can help by talking about how a man and woman fall in love and then may decide to have sex.


Torres, Karen Christy E. BSN III-C

mobile2712

Posts : 1
Join date : 2009-02-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

sex education for children

Post  princess on Fri Feb 13, 2009 11:50 pm

Sex education: Talking to school-age children about sex (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sex-education/CC00076)

Sex education doesn't need to be a single tell-all discussion. Follow your children's cues about what they need to know — and when.
Sex education often begins as simple anatomy lessons during the toddler years. During the school-age years, you might wonder how much your children really need to know about sex. Never fear. Sex education doesn't need to be a single tell-all discussion. Instead, follow your children's cues about what they need to know — and when.

Expect detailed questions
Younger children are often satisfied with vague answers to questions about where babies come from or how babies are born. But school-age children tend to make stronger connections between sexuality and making babies. As their questions about sex become more complex — and perhaps more embarrassing — they may turn to friends or other sources for information.

When your school-age children ask questions about sex, you might want to first ask your children what they already know. Correct any misconceptions, and then offer enough details to answer the specific questions. Avoid long lectures.

Consider these examples:

What's an erection? You might say: "A boy's penis is usually soft. But sometimes it gets hard and stands away from the body. This is called an erection." Describe how an erection can happen while a boy is sleeping or when his penis is touched. This might also be the time to describe a wet dream.
What's a period? You might say: "A period means that a girl's body is mature enough to become pregnant." Explain how menstruation is an important part of the reproductive cycle. You might offer details on bleeding and feminine hygiene products.
How do people have sex? If your children wonder about the mechanics of sex, be honest. You might say: "The man puts his penis inside the woman's vagina."
Can two girls have sex? Or two boys? For some children, it might be enough to say: "Yes. There are many types of intimate relationships." If your children want to know more, you might take the opportunity to talk about respect for others or to share your personal thoughts about homosexuality.
What's masturbation? You might say: "Masturbation is when a boy rubs his penis or a girl rubs her vagina." Remind your children that masturbation is a normal — but private — activity.
Even if you're uncomfortable, forge ahead.

According to this article,...we should never fear to teach about sex education to children just explain it in a rigth manner. Children is always curious and we should never let every teachable moment to them. For me they have the right to know about sex but giudance is very important. Remember, you're setting the stage for open, honest discussions in the years to come.

PRINCESS ESGUERRA BSN III-A

princess

Posts : 3
Join date : 2009-02-13

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 9) Is it possible to tell children too much about sex when they ask questions? Should all questions be answered or are there some things that children should not be told until they are older? Provide a sample outline of what you think should be taught at

Post  Iya Buenaventura on Sat Feb 14, 2009 1:21 pm

Believe it or not, Dr. Alfred Kinsey promoted it [1] (and SIECUS [2] still does) to further promiscuity, under the premise that it would reduce the incidence of STDs (sexually transmitted diseases), and that it would make for better marriages if people would be well-versed and experienced in sexual intercourse before marriage.[3] Of course, that's insane. The destruction of our families and the epidemic of STDs that followed should be more than enough proof that the sexual revolution caused more harm to society than many other things that befell mankind.[4]

The problem with the current trend in sex education is that it doesn't deliver what it promised, a better society.[5] If we teach children to use condoms, we tell them in effect that it is all right to have sex. We should therefore not be surprised that many children become promiscuous and thereby conceive children while they are still children themselves, or that they contract STDs.

Few children realize that condoms offer no protections at all against papilloma virus infections. Nor do they realize that condoms offer very little protection against hepatitis C or HIV infections. All three of these diseases are incurable and contribute, to varying extents, to early deaths. To boot, condom failures are frequent, especially if latex condoms are used in conjunction with lubricants that contain oils. [6, 7]

In the case of condom failure, the result is often a pregnancy. After all, the purpose of sexual intercourse is to cause a child to be conceived. Of course sexual intercourse feels good, but that is for no other reason than to ensure that people engage in it, so that children will be conceived. However, how can we have a functioning society based on unregulated, promiscuous sexual activities? Children may be capable of having sexual intercourse, but they are most definitely not capable of being very good parents, especially not in a society in which a record number of children who become parents at best don't have more than the support by half of their extended family — on account of growing up in single-mother families. To discuss hormone therapy as a contraceptive is pointless. It does nothing to prevent anyone from contracting STDs.

The biggest problem with the views promoted in sex education these days is that they don't stress the best and most effective method for the prevention of either pregnancies or STDs, that is to abstain or to remain chaste. [6, 7]

What is truly wrong with preserving one's virginity until one gets married? What blessings did the liberalization of sexual morals bring us? Are we truly better off with a very high rate of teen pregnancies, record numbers of out-of-wedlock births and epidemic rates of STDs?[4] We all know what the answer to that is, but few people in the education system are willing to risk their careers by promoting logic that is politically incorrect. To do so would bring them the wrath of the homosexual rights lobby which is busy teaching children, through the sex-education curriculum and in accordance to plan, that homosexuality is a valid alternative life style -- without teaching children about the risks to their lives that the "valid" homosexual life style causes.

Just the other day I heard someone make a very good comment that sums up my feelings quite nicely. Your body is a gift, the greatest gift that you can make to anyone. It is like a Christmas gift, in as much that few people will appreciate a Christmas gift that has been opened too many times already, let alone one that was damaged in the process (http://fathersforlife.org/health/sex-ed.htm)

*** for me, different strokes for different folks. you have to level whatever you are going to teach about with the people you are going to teach it to. do you expect children as young as 2 or 4 to understand the significance of the act of having sex.

the best way, for me, to teaching them is by their parents. by showing them how much they love and venerate each other. for single parents maybe instill in the children's mind that they should just enjoy their lives with their family and friends and that true love waits.

[i]Bueanventura, Rea Anna B. BSN III-E

Iya Buenaventura

Posts : 1
Join date : 2009-02-14

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 9) Is it possible to tell children too much about sex when they ask questions? Should all questions be answered or are there some things that children should not be told until they are older? Provide a sample outline of what you think should be taught at

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum