17. What for you is "sexual harassment"? Does it only pertain to physical actions or does it include verbal insinuations of one's sexuality as well?

Go down

17. What for you is "sexual harassment"? Does it only pertain to physical actions or does it include verbal insinuations of one's sexuality as well?

Post  VeraMarieGasang on Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:54 am

Gasang, Vera Marie B. III-A
17. What for you is "sexual harassment"? Does it only pertain to physical actions or does it include verbal insinuations of one's sexuality as well?

For me sexual harassment is an unwelcome conduct/ behavior. It is also undesirable and offensive. Sexual harasser can be a man or woman. It is also a discrimination of one’s dignity and a sinful act. For me sexual harassment also includes Uninvited touching or hugging, Requesting sexual favors for rewards related to school or work, Suggestive jokes of a sexual nature, Sexual pictures or displays, Continuing unwelcome flirtation or propositions, Obscene gestures or sounds, Written notes of a sexual nature. Also sexual harassment is both physical and verbal insinuations. Verbal includes saying bad or negative to other people. Saying sexual jokes and Sexual and intrusive questions about an individual's personal life for me are examples of the verbal insinuations.

I viewed an article regarding sexual harassment:

Sexual harassment is unwanted conduct of a sexual nature. That conduct can be physical or verbal. It can take place in any setting — the workplace, school, or elsewhere. The harasser can be of either gender as can be the victim. Furthermore, the harasser and victim do not have to be of the opposite sex in relation to each other.
A relatively new concept, sexual harassment began to gain attention sometime in the 70s and 80s. It was originally talked about in reference to male harassment towards women in the workplace. In the US, sexual harassment in the workplace, or any public accommodation, violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 because it is a form of sex discrimination.
The definition of sexual harassment has greatly expanded overtime. It includes what might be considered minor, though still offensive, forms of behavior directed at others, or even behaviors without specific direction. Further, harassment doesn’t always take place in a working relationship. It can also occur within the teacher-student relationship, which is often called the forgotten secret at the college level. Sexual harassment may include the following:
• Unwelcome comments about a person’s physical characteristics, or sexual behavior.
• Inappropriate sexually charged language when talking to co-workers, other students, or employees (such as telling an obscene joke).
• Discussing or speculating on the sexual orientation of another person or asking that person directly about their sexual habits, behavior or orientation.
• Unwelcome solicitations for dates or intercourse.
• Any form of physical contact that makes another person uncomfortable.
• Displaying materials of a sexual nature, such as inappropriate pictures, pornography, etc.
• Punitive behaviors designed to punish a worker who finds any approach of a sexual nature unwelcome.
The defining characteristic of sexual harassment is unwelcome sexual conduct. The recipient isn't the only one that can find the conduct unwelcome. Viewing or hearing the inappropriate conduct even though it was not directed at you could constitute sexual harassment.
Most people who study sexual harassment suggest that often, the best way of stopping it, is to directly ask the person to stop. Making the person aware that their behavior is unwelcome and unappreciated is often an important first step. But this approach is not always feasible. When this is the case, the issue should be taken to a higher-level employee or a person in authority. When the harasser is the person in authority, one should go another level higher. In the US, this often means filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).
Sometimes the sexual conduct is so violent or illegal in nature that it is important to report it directly to the police. Sexual battery, rape and stalking are all matters not only to be addressed by the authority figures in places where they occur but also by the police. Under these circumstances, it may be best to report such criminal behaviors to police officers first, especially if you fear for your personal safety.
Not only employers, but also schools and even volunteer organizations are moving to define and protect against sexual harassment. This is an important step, since such harassment remains a tremendous problem in our society.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-sexual-harassment.htm
bounce

VeraMarieGasang

Posts : 6
Join date : 2009-02-10

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Mae Maiquez III E

Post  Mae Maiquez on Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:34 am

Sexual Harassment for me is both pertains in physical actions and verbal insinuations of one's sexuality as well.
Sexual Harassment it is an act of unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature, submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly as term or condition of person's employment or a student's academic success, such conduct unreasonably interferes with an individual's work or academic performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working, or learning environment.

Sexual harassment is behavior that:

1. is unwanted or unwelcome
2. is sexual in nature or gender-based;
3. is severe, pervasive and/or repeated;
4. has an adverse impact on the workplace or academic environment;
5. often occurs in the context of a relationship where one person has more formal power that the other (such as a supervisor over an employee, or a faculty member over a student) or more informal power (such as one peer over another)

Sexual Harassment Comes in Many Forms
The following are behaviors which could be viewed as sexual harassment when they are unwelcome

VERBAL
-Whistling or making cat calls at someone
-Making sexual comments about a person's clothing or body
-Telling sexual jokes or stories
-Asking personal questions about sexual life, fantasies, preferences or history
-Repeatedly "asking out" a person who is not interested
-Turning work discussions to sexual topics
-Referring to an adult woman or man as a hunk, doll, babe or honey
-Telling lies or spreading rumors about a person's personal sex life

NON-VERBAL

-Paying unwanted attention to someone (i.e., staring, following, blocking a person's path)
-Displaying sexually suggestive visuals
-Making facial expressions such as winking, throwing kisses, or licking
-Giving personal gifts or a sexual nature
-Making sexual gestures with hands or through body movements

PHYSICAL

-Hanging around, standing close, or brushing up against a person
-Touching a person's clothing, hair, or body (to include giving a massage around the neck and shoulders)
-Touching or rubbing oneself sexually around another person
-Hugging, kissing, patting or stroking

An article below was attached to further explain what sexual harassment really was.

Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Title VII applies to employers with 15 or more employees, including state and local governments. It also applies to employment agencies and to labor organizations, as well as to the federal government.

Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual harassment when this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual's employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual's work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment.

Sexual harassment can occur in a variety of circumstances, including but not limited to the following:

* The victim as well as the harasser may be a woman or a man. The victim does not have to be of the opposite sex.
* The harasser can be the victim's supervisor, an agent of the employer, a supervisor in another area, a co-worker, or a non-employee.
* The victim does not have to be the person harassed but could be anyone affected by the offensive conduct.
* Unlawful sexual harassment may occur without economic injury to or discharge of the victim.
* The harasser's conduct must be unwelcome.

It is helpful for the victim to inform the harasser directly that the conduct is unwelcome and must stop. The victim should use any employer complaint mechanism or grievance system available.

When investigating allegations of sexual harassment, EEOC looks at the whole record: the circumstances, such as the nature of the sexual advances, and the context in which the alleged incidents occurred. A determination on the allegations is made from the facts on a case-by-case basis.

Prevention is the best tool to eliminate sexual harassment in the workplace. Employers are encouraged to take steps necessary to prevent sexual harassment from occurring. They should clearly communicate to employees that sexual harassment will not be tolerated. They can do so by providing sexual harassment training to their employees and by establishing an effective complaint or grievance process and taking immediate and appropriate action when an employee complains.

It is also unlawful to retaliate against an individual for opposing employment practices that discriminate based on sex or for filing a discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or litigation under Title VII.
Statistics

In Fiscal Year 2007, EEOC received 12,510 charges of sexual harassment. 16.0% of those charges were filed by males. EEOC resolved 11,592 sexual harassment charges in FY 2007 and recovered $49.9 million in monetary benefits for charging parties and other aggrieved individuals (not including monetary benefits obtained through litigation).

source: http://www.eeoc.gov/types/sexual_harassment.html

Mae Maiquez

Posts : 1
Join date : 2009-02-14

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Jessa Stephanie R Lu BSN III-E

Post  jecky on Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:06 am

in my opinion, sexual harrasment is not only limited to physical abuse but also verbal abuse as well. based on my research the behaviors listed below are all classified under sexual harrassment

The behaviors listed below are examples of some of the behaviors that can constitute sexual harassment. Sexual harassment occurs if the behavior is sexual and unwanted, if an individual's employment position is dependent on submitting to or accepting the behavior, or if it contributes to an offensive, hostile, or uncomfortable work environment.

These behaviors are unacceptable, and should not be present in the formal, informal, on-site of off-site work environment:

Sexual jokes, innuendos, and gestures;
Unsolicited and unwelcome flirtations, advances of propositions, however subtle;
Graphic or degrading comments about someone's appearance, dress, or body;
Staring at an individual or focusing upon a particular area of the body;
Elevator eyes. looking someone up and down;
Whistling, cat calls, leering;
Terms of address such as "honey", "baby", "chick," "hunk", or "dear";
Regularly offering personal gifts such as flowers, candy, etc.
Display of sexually suggestive objects or pictures;
Sexual or intrusive questions about an individual's personal life;
Explicit descriptions of the harasser's own sexual experiences;
Neck or shoulder massages;
Pressure ( however subtle) for sexual activity;
Explicit offers of sex for grades, money, or other rewards;
Any unnecessary, unwanted physical contact such as touching, rubbing, hugging, pinching, patting, or kissing;
Physical or sexual assault, including rape

source:http://das.ohio.gov/eod/AAEEOWhatIs.htm

jecky

Posts : 1
Join date : 2009-02-14

View user profile

Back to top Go down

What for you is "sexual harassment"? Does it only pertain to physical actions or does it include verbal insinuations of one's sexuality as well?

Post  gagaoverpurple on Sat Mar 21, 2009 6:20 am

Sexual harassment pertains not only to physical actions that a victim finds malicious or is unwelcome but to verbal conducts of sexual nature that is offensive, intimidating and hostile. Often, though not in all cases, the attacker is in power or authority over the victim. Even though a victim could be twice the size of the attacker, or is older, he or she may seem or feel helpless due to the verbal abuse that the attacker would almost always use to put his/her victim to a state of powerlessness and compliance (e.g. blackmail). Because of this, sexual harassment is also considered as a form of bullying.

Sexual harassment is present in many forms. It could be used by an attacker as a blackmail, "quid pro quo" or something in exchange for something and many more. Sexual harassment is not hard to recognize. If the victims demeanor is affected by the attack in any way, sexual harassment may be present and should be stopped immediately.

gagaoverpurple

Posts : 1
Join date : 2009-03-21

View user profile

Back to top Go down

What for you is "sexual harassment"? Does it only pertain to physical actions or does it include verbal insinuations of one's sexuality as well?

Post  Cyrille Pampuan on Sun Mar 22, 2009 7:27 am

for me, sexual harassment does not only pertains to physical actions but also verbal insinuation which is offensive to a non-consenting person.

According to these sources:
Sexual harassment includes comments on a person's appearance or dress, sexually suggestive or explicit jokes, unwanted sexual overtures, staring and other behavior designed to make someone uncomfortable, and unwanted touching anywhere on a person's body, including bumping into them and brushing up against someone.

Sexual harassment can be verbal and include:

-comments about your body, clothing, or sexual activities

-sexual jokes, remarks, or teasing

-requests or demands for sexual favors that come with hints or stated threats about your job.

Sexual harassment can also be nonverbal and include:

-insulting sounds

-leering or staring at your body

-obscene gestures

-displays of pornographic or sexually suggestive materials

-creating a hostile work environment

Finally, sexual harassment can be physical and include:

-touching or pinching

-brushing up or bumping against your body

-sexual assault

Source: http://www.bridgesnh.org/harassment_base.htm

What You Can Do

When you are deciding what to do, remember that every situation is different. There is no one best thing to do. You should always report the sexual harassment to your employer. You then have the option to use your company’s sexual harassment complaint process, file a charge with a state or federal agency, and/or go to court.


It is important to talk with a lawyer or legal services organization like Equal Rights Advocates to discuss your choices. They can help you to understand your choices, their benefits and risks as well as the strengths and weaknesses of your case.

Say “No” Clearly

Tell the person that his/her behavior offends you. Firmly refuse all invitations. If the harassment doesn’t end promptly, write a letter asking the harasser to stop and keep a copy.

Write Down What Happened

As soon as you experience the sexual harassment, start writing it down. Write down dates, places, times, and possible witnesses to what happened. If possible, ask your co-workers to write down what they saw or heard, especially if the same thing is happening to them. Remember that others may (and probably will) read this written record at some point. It is a good idea to keep the record at home or in some other safe place. Do not keep the record at work.

Report the Harassment

Tell your supervisor, your human resources department or some other department or person within your organization who has the power to stop the harassment. If possible, tell them in writing. Keep a copy of any written complaint you make to your employer. It is very important that you report the harassment because your employer must know or have reason to know about the harassment in order to be legally responsible for a co-worker, client or customer’s actions. Even if your harasser was your supervisor, you may need to show that you reported the harassment to your employer or give a good reason why you didn’t.

Start a Paper Trail

When you report the sexual harassment to your employer, do it in writing. Describe the problem and how you want it fixed. This creates a written record of when you complained and what happened in response to it. Keep copies of everything you send and receive from your employer.

Use the Grievance Procedure at Work

Many employers and schools have policies for dealing with sexual harassment complaints. You may be able to resolve the problem through this process. To find out your employer’s policies, look in your employee manual/personnel policies and/or speak to a human resources officer. It is important to follow your employer’s procedures.

Involve your Union

If you belong to a union, you may want to file a formal sexual harassment complaint through the union and try to get a shop steward or other union official to help you work through the grievance process. Get a copy of your union’s grievance policy and see if it discusses the problems you are experiencing. If you use your union’s grievance procedure, you must still file a complaint with a government agency if you want to file a lawsuit in federal or state court.

Source: www.ibew1245.com/womens-section/Sexual-Harassment.htm

bom

Cyrille Pampuan

Posts : 1
Join date : 2009-03-22

View user profile

Back to top Go down

Re: 17. What for you is "sexual harassment"? Does it only pertain to physical actions or does it include verbal insinuations of one's sexuality as well?

Post  Sponsored content


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

Back to top

- Similar topics

 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum