BSN III-A's ANSWERS REGARDING THE TOPIC OF SEXUALITY

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BSN III-A's ANSWERS REGARDING THE TOPIC OF SEXUALITY

Post  VeraMarieGasang on Tue Feb 10, 2009 7:55 am

dito na lang natin post III-A... thanks Smile - Vera Gasang *.*


Last edited by VeraMarieGasang on Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:22 am; edited 1 time in total

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2) How do you think children should be taught about sexual anatomy? When should this teaching begin?

Post  VeraMarieGasang on Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:18 am

GASANG, VERA MARIE B. III-A

2) How do you think children should be taught about sexual anatomy? When should this teaching begin?

Our child’s sexual education begins soon after birth and continues throughout the early years. The positive attitudes and feelings we pass to our children through gentle touching, rocking and other signs of affection help to form
each child’s self-esteem. This self-esteem influences our son’s and daughter’s decisions during the later adolescent and adult years.
The preschooler needs to learn the proper names for parts of the body and where babies come from. Early use of anatomically correct terms such as penis, vagina and rectum show our children that these topics are open for discussion and are neither dirty nor embarrassing.
As the child enters grade school, the questions become more probing and certainly more interesting. This is an ideal time to show that no questions are off limits. At the very least, it is suggested the basics of reproduction be explained.
By age 10, puberty begins to take hold and body images begin to change. This is a time for attention to detail. Discussions about menstruation, puberty and sexually transmitted diseases are all appropriate. Being a good listener is essential along with a readiness to share your personal feelings. This is probably the most impressionable of times. It is at this educational level that we tend to differ from our European counterparts. The significantly lower numbers of teen pregnancies in Europe are not because of increased abortion rates or to an increased level of abstinence. The kids are simply better educated, have access to contraception and have protected sexual activities. Europeans start teaching their children about sex in kindergarten and the first grade. Having taught sex education to grade school kids, we can tell you that the children have already formulated specific views on sex by age 10 or 11. To make an impact, we definitely need to start early.
By age 12, discussions regarding sexual activity, erections, birth control, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases, abstinence and peer relationships should be emphasized. If one waits much beyond this time period, important beliefs and attitudes may be solidified and difficult to modify.
When is the best time to discuss sex and sexuality with your child? Earlier than you may think is necessary and at every chance you get!
Sex Education Pearls: By Age 5...sexual body parts, the right to say "no" to unwanted touching, know where babies come from. By Age 10... brief answers regarding reproduction, menstruation, changes to expect in puberty, begin discussing sexually transmitted diseases. By Age 12... basic sexuality with emphasis on normal feelings, erections & wet dreams, birth control, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases, how to say no, peer relationships.

by Craig R. Sweet, M.D.
& Larry Goldman, M.D.

Based on the said literature, in my own opinion knowledge is power and power allows children to make educated decisions that will affect the rest of their lives. First children should be taught in a manner that is both scientific and conservative. Words should be carefully chosen to avoid imparting the wrong impression. Questions regarding sex often are asked quite early and certainly when least expected. Early discussions are very important and show the child that they are an approachable parent. He or she will begin to build confidence about their answers and opinions and the confidence in discussing sex and sexuality will also grow. It’s good to encourage parents and educators to keep their minds open and to educate children at a younger age then they may have thought appropriate. Perhaps it is time to discuss the difficult issues of sex and to dispel the myths that promote unprotected intercourse for young teens which result in unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. The topic should be discussed truthfully, open discussion and minimal criticism and judgment. Likewise, it is also the right of every parent to determine how and when their children should learn about sex and the consequences of sexual activity. If they do not talk about sex, it suggests to children that sex is bad or shouldn’t be discussed. When talking about sex, people need to remember to be both a listener and an educator. They need to discuss honestly such topics as penetration, orgasm, ejaculation, sexually transmitted diseases, homosexuality and masturbation. Always be honest, assume nothing and listen carefully to the questions. Remember, if people encourage children to openly ask questions about sex, they also ask questions about other important subjects. Being overly judgmental will quickly break down communication. This doesn’t mean that everything that children do or say is right, but there are ways to show concerns without being demeaning or judgmental.
Laughing Laughing

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17. What for you is "sexual harassment"? Does it only pertain to physical actions or does it include verbal insinuations of one's sexuality as well?

Post  VeraMarieGasang on Tue Feb 10, 2009 8:57 am

Gasang, Vera Marie B. III-A
17. What for you is "sexual harassment"? Does it only pertain to physical actions or does it include verbal insinuations of one's sexuality as well?

For me sexual harassment is an unwelcome conduct/ behavior. It is also undesirable and offensive. Sexual harasser can be a man or woman. It is also a discrimination of one’s dignity and a sinful act. For me sexual harassment also includes Uninvited touching or hugging, Requesting sexual favors for rewards related to school or work, Suggestive jokes of a sexual nature, Sexual pictures or displays, Continuing unwelcome flirtation or propositions, Obscene gestures or sounds, Written notes of a sexual nature. Also sexual harassment is both physical and verbal insinuations. Verbal includes saying bad or negative to other people. Saying sexual jokes and Sexual and intrusive questions about an individual's personal life for me are examples of the verbal insinuations.

I viewed an article regarding sexual harassment:

Sexual harassment is unwanted conduct of a sexual nature. That conduct can be physical or verbal. It can take place in any setting — the workplace, school, or elsewhere. The harasser can be of either gender as can be the victim. Furthermore, the harasser and victim do not have to be of the opposite sex in relation to each other.
A relatively new concept, sexual harassment began to gain attention sometime in the 70s and 80s. It was originally talked about in reference to male harassment towards women in the workplace. In the US, sexual harassment in the workplace, or any public accommodation, violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 because it is a form of sex discrimination.
The definition of sexual harassment has greatly expanded overtime. It includes what might be considered minor, though still offensive, forms of behavior directed at others, or even behaviors without specific direction. Further, harassment doesn’t always take place in a working relationship. It can also occur within the teacher-student relationship, which is often called the forgotten secret at the college level. Sexual harassment may include the following:
• Unwelcome comments about a person’s physical characteristics, or sexual behavior.
• Inappropriate sexually charged language when talking to co-workers, other students, or employees (such as telling an obscene joke).
• Discussing or speculating on the sexual orientation of another person or asking that person directly about their sexual habits, behavior or orientation.
• Unwelcome solicitations for dates or intercourse.
• Any form of physical contact that makes another person uncomfortable.
• Displaying materials of a sexual nature, such as inappropriate pictures, pornography, etc.
• Punitive behaviors designed to punish a worker who finds any approach of a sexual nature unwelcome.
The defining characteristic of sexual harassment is unwelcome sexual conduct. The recipient isn't the only one that can find the conduct unwelcome. Viewing or hearing the inappropriate conduct even though it was not directed at you could constitute sexual harassment.
Most people who study sexual harassment suggest that often, the best way of stopping it, is to directly ask the person to stop. Making the person aware that their behavior is unwelcome and unappreciated is often an important first step. But this approach is not always feasible. When this is the case, the issue should be taken to a higher-level employee or a person in authority. When the harasser is the person in authority, one should go another level higher. In the US, this often means filing a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).
Sometimes the sexual conduct is so violent or illegal in nature that it is important to report it directly to the police. Sexual battery, rape and stalking are all matters not only to be addressed by the authority figures in places where they occur but also by the police. Under these circumstances, it may be best to report such criminal behaviors to police officers first, especially if you fear for your personal safety.
Not only employers, but also schools and even volunteer organizations are moving to define and protect against sexual harassment. This is an important step, since such harassment remains a tremendous problem in our society.

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-sexual-harassment.htm
Very Happy

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GONZALES, Mark Christopher O.

Post  sleepybunny005 on Fri Feb 13, 2009 12:01 am

7) Describe your idea of an ideal contraceptive method. What are the most essential criteria? What are additional features? Do any features exist which approximate this idea?

Honckenberry, M.J. & Wilson, D. (2007). WONG'S NURSING CARE OF INFANTS AND CHILDREN (8th edition, pp.864-865). Philippines: Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd.

Family Planning services have developed and expanded during recent years. Contraceptive use among adolescents continues to increase. Contraceptive options have expanded over the past decade as well. Although all teenagers need sexuality education, not all of them are candidates for contraception. Among large adolescent population, some have made the decision to postpone sexual involvement, some are in exclusively same-sex relationships, and some also may wish to have a child.

Method Advantages Disadvantages
Abstinence100% effective in preventing sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and pregnancyPeer pressure to conform. Relatively high failure rate from noncompliance


Abstinence is the most ideal contraception for me. As mentioned earlier, many adolescents have postponed sexual involvement, thus, it is not a need at a point in time that it is not necessary. The most essential criteria with the choice of contraception for me is the effectiveness. The security that nothing unlikely for the partners will happen. Abstinence having the highest effectiveness is thus the most favorable. It will prevent disease transmission as well as prevent unwanted or untimely pregnancy. It is most important that the partners or an individual should have a philosophy of preparing a future for the coming of a child. Unplanned pregnancy can lead to a lot of problems. Another part of this ideal contraception is spiritual guidance. Seeking God's will for our plans in life will surely be effective than any other methods. Smile

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To Mark

Post  Sue Estrella on Fri Feb 13, 2009 10:44 pm

Wow naman Mark. Puede ka nang mag-pari. Hahaha. Amazing answer. Very Happy

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Question #19

Post  Sue Estrella on Fri Feb 13, 2009 10:53 pm

19. In an article (http://www.stdservices.on.net/std/social_aspects/disability.htm), one physically disabled woman wrote regarding the issues she faced when she became pregnant: "How could you do it?" was a question which had many nuances and was put to me by many people during and after my pregnancy. The GP wondered how I could have had intercourse in my "predicament" . . . you see, not only was it immoral to be an unmarried mother, it was doubly immoral to be an unmarried mother AND a severely disabled person . . .". In your opinion, do you agree with the views of the health care providers on the pregnancy of this disabled woman? If so, why? If not, give your explanation as well.


Why is it immoral for a disabled person to become pregnant? She has a right to be happy. I myself would wonder how did she do it but I won't judge or show discrimination. It is in fact a miracle. The baby is God's gift to her. We should all respect that and stop making an issue out of it. Sex should not be stereotyped to youth and physical attractiveness only. That is just low... After all, sex is mainly for procreation.

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To Vera

Post  Sue Estrella on Fri Feb 13, 2009 10:54 pm

Yes! Say NO to sexual harassment!!! Haha.

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Question #6....

Post  jannic on Sat Feb 14, 2009 1:18 am

6) The text states that in ancient times a menstruating woman was regarded as unclean and dangerous and that, even today, many couples avoid having intercourse while a woman is menstruating. What are the reasons for these negative values? What are your views about this statement?


Menstruation
Although menstruation is a normal part of the female reproductive cycle, it is the subject of considerable misunderstanding as a taboo.

Menstruation is the sloughing off of the uterine lining that builds up during the previous month. It occurs about once a month in most women between the ages of approximately 12 and 48.

In ancient times, a menstruating woman was regarded as unclean and liable to pollute foods she handled, or cause crops to wither. The primary reason for this taboo seems to be the fear of blood .pale

It is thought that menstrual taboos were enforced by men who connected a woman's monthly cycle with the turning of the tides, the changing of the seasons and other events that were mysterious to them.

Superstition and taboos around a woman's monthly cycle continue to persist in our contemporary society.

A common superstition in western culture is the belief that walking under a ladder will bring you bad luck. This myth supposedly evolved from earlier times when people would not walk under a bridge in case a menstruating woman was nearby because they feared her blood would fall on their head.

The belief that the normal process of menstruation is somehow dirty or evil is still evident in the slang expressions of a woman having the "curse" or being "on the rag". affraid (health.discovery.com/centers/sex/sexpedia/taboo_02.html)


Menstruation and the Bible study
Under Old Testament law, a woman was to be put apart during menstruation:

And if a woman have an issue, [and] her issue in her flesh be blood, she shall be put apart seven days: and whosoever toucheth her shall be unclean until the even. And every thing that she lieth upon in her separation shall be unclean: every thing also that she sitteth upon shall be unclean. And whosoever toucheth her bed shall wash his clothes, and bathe [himself] in water, and be unclean until the even. And whosoever toucheth any thing that she sat upon shall wash his clothes, and bathe [himself] in water, and be unclean until the even. And if it [be] on [her] bed, or on any thing whereon she sitteth, when he toucheth it, he shall be unclean until the even. And if any man lie with her at all, and her flowers be upon him, he shall be unclean seven days; and all the bed whereon he lieth shall be unclean. (Leviticus 15:19-24) (http://www.conservapedia.com/Menstruation)

While some women feel may feel uncomfortable about having sexual intercourse during menstruation, it’s perfectly OK, and may even help relieve menstrual cramps. In fact, although not scientifically proven, researchers have associated sex during menstruation with decreased endometriosis, as well as with several other health benefits including a long life; absence of heart disease, stroke, and breast cancer; healthy immunity; regulating the menstrual cycle; pain management; and improved quality of life. While the health benefits of sexual intercourse need more study, there is no health reason not to have sex during menstruation, so, go ahead, and have sex during your period if you want to! lol! (http://pms.about.com/od/myths/a/menstrual_myths.htm)

"Having an intercourse during a menstrual period is often seen by men and many couples view it as messy and sloppy and it leads to avoidance of intimate activities for hygienic reasons". -jannic

Like a Star @ heaven JAN NICOLE S. DELICANA BSN III-A GROUP 2 Like a Star @ heaven

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Should contraceptives and birth control information be made available to minors through school clinics? If so, at what age should they be available?

Post  antin on Sat Feb 14, 2009 3:50 am

[/b]nowadays, most of our younger generations were already liberated. they are what we call "mapusok", they will try everything, they are risk takers. Twisted Evil for me, it's okay if we should give contraceptive and birth control information in the school clinics. the right age for conducting this lecture is around 12-13 years old. they are already mature enough to understand the topics that they will encounter. there is no harm in giving them right information. we want them to be educated and not to be encouraged to have sex, to be enlightened in the possible consequences that might happen. Very Happy . we just want to prevent, reduce or minimize the increasing number of pre-marital sex and teenage pregnancy because they are not yet ready for a bigger responsibilities. lol!

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...

Post  antin on Sat Feb 14, 2009 3:52 am

ang hahaba naman ng mga sagot nyo...astig amp!hahah...rock on...pwede na kaung gmawa ng libro..

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BY: MANALO, Lorenzo B. BSN 3A

Post  zack9090 on Sat Feb 14, 2009 5:45 am

For my critique, birth control and contraceptives should be available to minor ages. Provided that they have adequate knowledge on how to use it, possible effects and outcomes, problems that they may encounter, but most of all, education is the most important tool for them inorder to solve the crisis on premarital sex. Most minors perform this act due to curiosity and/or peer pressure. I can safely conclude that adequate knowledge and awareness should be strictly taught to minor or even to all ages if necessary. afro

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Should contraceptives and birth control information be made available to minors through school clinics? If so, at what age should they be available? BY MANALO, Lorenzo B.

Post  zack9090 on Sat Feb 14, 2009 6:06 am

First of all, I have chosen as one of my topics because it not only involves locally, but also, internationally. According to the Campaign for a Commercial Free Childhood, Teen girls who watch more then 14 hours of rap videos are more likely to have multiple sex partners and to be diagnosed with a STD. 42% of the songs on the top 10 CDs in 1999 contained sexual content, 19% included direct descriptions of sexual intercourse.

And according to Heritage.org:

Every day, 8,000 teenagers in the United States become infected by a sexually transmitted disease.[1] This year, nearly 3 million teens will become infected. Overall, roughly one-quarter of the nation's sexually active teens have been infected by a sexually transmitted disease (STD).
When compared to teens that are not sexually active, teenage boys and girls who are sexually active are significantly less likely to be happy and more likely to feel depressed.
When compared to teens that are not sexually active, teenage boys and girls who are sexually active are significantly more likely to attempt suicide.
25.3% of sexually active teens are depressed vs. 7.7% of teens who are not sexually active.
14.3% of sexually active girls attempted suicide while 5.1% of teens who are not sexually active have attempted suicide.
In general, individuals who engage in premarital sexual activity are 50 percent more likely to divorce later in life than those who do not.10 Divorce, in turn, leads to sharp reductions in adult happiness and child well-being.
A study reported in Pediatrics magazine found that sexually active boys aged 12 through 16 are four times more likely to smoke and six times more likely to use alcohol than are those who describe themselves as virgins. Among girls in this same age cohort, those who are sexually active are seven times more likely to smoke and 10 times more likely to use marijuana than are those who are virgins.

Now, for your opinion, based on the figures shown above, do you think that this is already enough to use contraceptives to minor ages? Or is it already TOO MUCH, that it came to the point that it should STRICTLY be implemented? The decision will be yours. But for me, I think that it should be available to minor ages.

Now what's your decision? afro

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Should contraceptives and birth control information be made available to minors through school clinics? If so, at what age should they be available? BY Martinez, Virra Kris M.

Post  virra on Sat Feb 14, 2009 7:33 am

In my opinion, contraceptives and birth control information should be made available to minors because it promote safe sex and discouraging pregnancy. By giving them information, they are having an idea on how to prevent pregnancy. Teens nowadays have already accepted the idea of having sex at younger and younger ages. If a minor has no job, education or money to have a child then they don't have the ritgh to have sex. Except from school, it is also the parents responsibility to talk to their child regarding sex. Each child grows and matures at his or her own pace. Arriving at sexual maturity is a matter of development over a period of years and as a result of many influences. The most significant influence is the family, especially the parents
of the individual. Parents have a particular and vested love for the child. Parents are in the best position to be aware of a child's psychological and emotional growth, of a child's gradually ncreasing awareness of himself or herself as a sexual person, male or female.For me contraceptives and birth control information should be given to teens who are at the age of 12 to 18 since teenage pregancies nowadays are common.

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Re: BSN III-A's ANSWERS REGARDING THE TOPIC OF SEXUALITY

Post  leslie dawn cerbolles on Sat Feb 14, 2009 9:30 am

6) The text states that in ancient times a menstruating woman was regarded as unclean and dangerous and that, even today, many couples avoid having intercourse while a woman is menstruating. What are the reasons for these negative values? What are your views about this statement?



Fr: http://www.webmd.com/sex/sex-menstruation

Unfortunately there is still a great deal of misinformation circulating about women's menstrual cycles. We're past the days when we believed a menstruating woman would curdle milk with which she came into contact. Yet many still wonder whether menstrual blood isn't somehow "dirty." The belief that sex during a woman's period could be somehow dangerous or unhealthy has its origins in myths such as these.
The reality is that menstrual blood is nothing more than the remains of the uterine lining, shed after it's no longer needed. This lining builds up to prepare for the possible implanting of a fertilized egg. But if a woman doesn't become pregnant, then it's shed over the course of several days and a new lining begins to build.
Sex during menstruation doesn't pose any additional health risk to you or your partner.
If either of you has a sexually transmittable infection, the blood can make it easier to transmit. However, there would always be a chance of transmission even if you weren't having your period. If this is at all a concern for you, you should be using a condom -- menstrual cycle or not!
Remember that just because you're having your period doesn't mean you can't get pregnant. Be sure to continue using birth control unless you are trying to become pregnant.
Of course, sex during a woman's period is a little messier. Many couples, however, take great pleasure in the extra lubrication and "earthiness" of it. About the only "precaution" you need to take is putting down a towel first if you are worried about staining the sheets (and maybe having a few moist towels laying around for use afterwards). But beyond that, and the caveat about infections such as HIV, there's no other reason to be concerned.
And many women find sex eases the cramps that sometimes come with menstruation. It seems to be the orgasms that do it: Many women report that an orgasm or two -- with or without intercourse -- works better than any drug. Of course, having sex also gives you a great distraction!
So feel free to have all the sex you want during your period. In fact, if it helps your cramps, then you can even say, "Doctor's orders!"


Fr: http://www.cosmopolitan.com/sex-love/advice/questions/menstruation-affect-sex-drive

Many women report an increase in libido during their period, though the jury is still out on the exact reasons why. It might have to do with fluctuating hormones, which tend to be high during ovulation and low during menstruation. It's possible that you're in an amorous mood because PMS is alleviated by the onset of your period. Or, you could feel sexier due to increased blood flow and lubrication in your below-the-belt region. Another theory: Maybe you're more relaxed with sex at this point of your cycle because you're less likely to become pregnant (though experts say there is still a slim chance that it could happen). It could also be a combination of any of these.

Since libido and hormonal changes vary from month to month — and from woman to woman — the reasons why you feel more randy at certain times probably vary as well. Just enjoy the fact that you've got a healthy sex drive and try to make the most of it. If you and/or your guy are a little squeamish about doing the deed when you're menstruating, you can always use a cervical cap, diaphragm, or menstrual cup to avoid any messiness.

FR: http://www.epigee.org/menstruation/sex.html
Though frowned upon in many cultures and faiths, sexual intercourse during menstruation is entirely normal and completely healthy.


[My stand about this topic is that I think it is really messy and eccentric but it depends on how the couples who do it. I think protection such as a condom would really help. If a woman likes to do it, then it is her will, we have no right to object. It’s all up to the partners or the couples if they prefer to do the act. In the above literature it is viewed healthy to some. People have different preference, we have different views, likes and dislikes because no two other person are alike. We all have different ways in thinking. If we want something and it is in accordance to the law and that it could not hurt others or ourselves, then we should go for it. It depends upon the situation if I will do it or not someday.
alien lol! cheers

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GONZALES, Mark Christopher O.

Post  sleepybunny005 on Sat Feb 14, 2009 9:40 am

12) Should contraceptives and birth control information be made available to minors through school clinics? If so, at what age should they be available?

In relation to my first post (click here), there is one single contraceptive that has been most effective and thus should be available through school clinics. That is abstinence should be taught until the time of marriage. From the time of Freud's genital stage, it is one of the best options for when to teach this because here is the time when individuals begin to be aware about relationships. It was in quoted in victorianweb.org that
During the final stage of psychosexual development, the individual develops a strong sexual interest in the opposite sex.

Source:
Wagner, K.V. (2009). Retrieved February 14, 2009 from http://www.victorianweb.org/science/freud/develop.html

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13)Does listening to popular music and watching music videos with explicit sexual lyrics and actions increase the likelihood that teenagers will become sexually active? Why or why not?

Post  pepper-oni on Sat Feb 14, 2009 10:52 am

As an adolescent of this era (nyahahaha), I do believe that teenagers will do have an increase of becoming sexually active and for me it's normal for this stage because according to Freud's 5th stage of Psychosexual Development, which is the Genital Stage, the drive of the Libido is towards the experience of pleasure with others. This is where your Ego and Superego comes in. The Ego limits the individual's striving for what the Id desires.It fixes practical limits, not to be crossed without fear of punishment greater than the pleasure anticipated. The Superego naman limits action on moral grounds and it also informs the individual what should not be done, on pain of conscious guilt and unconscious anxiety. . so for me, it is only the way how those teenagers react and how will they control their id personality.

Remember: Personality is to a man what perfume is to a flower. +Charles M. Schwab+
lol!

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4) Is the uncircumcised male at a disadvantage in our culture? Why or why not? by Elito Mabaet

Post  elieli on Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:00 am

4) Is the uncircumcised male at a disadvantage in our culture? Why or why not? by Elito Mabaet

In my opinion, it is a disadvantage for our culture that a male is uncircumcised. Being circumcised is a part of manhood or "pagkabinata". When one is not circumcised, he can be called "supot" by peers and can also be judged as unclean. It is an essential part of growing up because it is the so-called transition from a "boy" to a "man". The parents is also a factor of pressuring their son to be circumcised as to their culture and belief. In addition, undergoing circumcision, in medical terms, is the removal of the foreskin (prepuce) from the penis. It is an effective method of hygiene and lowers the risk of having infection or related diseases.

According to this site:
What is the most common basis for the practice of circumcision in the Philippines?

As part of the non-medical non-religious rituals, as a rite of passage to manhood for the adolescent male children, as a result of fear of cultural stigma of being teased “supot”, as a result of peer pressure and as a result of the belief that all males should be circumcised with no specified reason. If there is a reason expressed by a parent, especially the mother, the reason is usually a myth, such as circumcision will make the boy cleaner, grow faster and taller.
http://uncircumcisedfilipinos.blogspot.com/

ELITO MABAET BSN III-A

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TO Mr. Manalo

Post  elieli on Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:19 am

I agree with Mr. Lorenzo Manalo aka ENZALOR had discussed, it is very helpful for minor ages to be educated with sex education to minimize or eradicate premarital sex and prevent sexually transmitted diseases. This is a very interesting topic for minor ages so that they may be aware of the effects and outcomes. Using contraceptives and birth control is the method that may avoid teenage pregnancy.

This site have information about birth control and contraceptives: http://www.avert.org/cpills.htm

ELITO MABAET BSN III-A

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Re: BSN III-A's ANSWERS REGARDING THE TOPIC OF SEXUALITY

Post  jannic on Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:28 am

antin wrote:ang hahaba naman ng mga sagot nyo...astig amp!hahah...rock on...pwede na kaung gmawa ng libro..

para madrama naman haha! at merun dapat proof ung sagot... alien

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13)Does listening to popular music and watching music videos with explicit sexual lyrics and actions increase the likelihood that teenagers will become sexually active? Why or why not?

Post  adrian mangosong on Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:35 am

We all know that adolescents are media junkies, with some studies showing that they consume some six to seven hours of media a day. And we all know that a good chunk of that media has at least a bit of sexual imagery in it. Twisted Evil Twisted Evil

But what perhaps we don’t all know is that teenagers who are exposed to more sexual content in the media are actually more sexually active. While this might seem intuitive, and thus not all that surprising, new research actually documents the pervasiveness of media's influence. Evil or Very Mad Evil or Very Mad

In their study, the researchers looked at the media consumption and sexual activity and intentions of more than 1,000 adolescents ages 12-15 in the southeastern U.S. Those studied included equal proportions of black and white, male and female students.

The children were asked which media they used regularly, including TV, movies, music and magazines. They were asked to specify the particular programs, movies, music artists and magazines they consumed.

Based on these results, the content of 264 movies, TV shows, music and magazines were analyzed for sexual imagery, including references to puberty, romantic relationships, nudity, sexual innuendo, kissing and sexual intercourse.

“These findings show that adolescents who are exposed to more sexual content in their media diets, and who perceive greater support from the media for teen sexual behavior, report more sexual activity and greater intentions to engage in sexual intercourse in the near future,” write the researchers.

By Heidi Dawley
Mar 22, 2006

http://www.medialifemagazine.com/cgi-bin/artman/exec/view.cgi?archive=170&num=3604

Indeed media increases the likelihood of sexual activity. Media is everywhere, it is everything we see. it may change our perception, ou belief, our practice. It may actually make something wrong seem right

Adrian Mangosong BSN3A

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Does listening to popular music and watching music videos with explicit sexual lyrics and actions increase the likelihood that teenagers will become sexually active? Why or why not?

Post  ilovejay on Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:49 am

by: Joseph Justin S. Francisco IIIA
from: http://www.caah.chw.edu.au/conference/papers/paper_02.pdf
Although MTV and music videos have defined an entire generation, it is
unclear how popular they are among today’s teenagers. In addition, music videos
now represent a minority of MTV programming. Shows like ‘‘Real Life’’ are
extremely popular on MTV. One content analysis from the early 1990s found that
women frequently are portrayed as ‘‘bimbos’’ [34]. But Black Entertainment
Television now features the most problematic videos (Table 1) [35]. As one TV
critic opined [36]:
If there is such a thing as a typical music video, it features one or more
men performing while beautiful, scantily clad young women dance and
writhe lasciviously.
Rock music lyrics—which have become increasingly graphic as well—do not
seem to have the same impact on listeners. This may be because teenagers are
listening to the beat, rather than the lyrics, or because the ability to comprehend
the lyrics is age-dependent [37]

yes, music videos portrays events that is happening at real life, this could be an influencing factor especially if the individual admires the artist. The "in" factor would also be influential to the individual. Teenagers are very curious about sexuality on this stage and some factor of influence would be enough. and no (in relation to rock music), teenagers would still focus on the song itself, primarily on the beat rather than the lyrics. The individuals ability to comprehend the lyrics is also a factor.

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Re: BSN III-A's ANSWERS REGARDING THE TOPIC OF SEXUALITY

Post  jannic on Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:51 am

12) Should contraceptives and birth control information be made available to minors through school clinics? If so, at what age should they be available?
In todays society we cannot help the curiosity that fogs the clouds the mind of the minors. So, for me contraceptives and birth control information should be available in any age group, to satisfy thier thirst for curiosity. Just the information...
But not to the extent of its use in pre-marital sex. Because it is not ment abide or tolerate for premarital sex. Cool

Like a Star @ heaven Jan Nicole S. Delicana BSN III-A Group 2 Like a Star @ heaven

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2) How do you think children should be taught about sexual anatomy? When should this teaching begin? by CORRO, EMMANUEL III-A Group 1

Post  Leuname on Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:04 pm

VeraMarieGasang wrote:

Our child’s sexual education begins soon after birth and continues throughout the early years. The positive attitudes and feelings we pass to our children through gentle touching, rocking and other signs of affection help to form
each child’s self-esteem. This self-esteem influences our son’s and daughter’s decisions during the later adolescent and adult years.
The preschooler needs to learn the proper names for parts of the body and where babies come from. Early use of anatomically correct terms such as penis, vagina and rectum show our children that these topics are open for discussion and are neither dirty nor embarrassing.
As the child enters grade school, the questions become more probing and certainly more interesting. This is an ideal time to show that no questions are off limits. At the very least, it is suggested the basics of reproduction be explained.
By age 10, puberty begins to take hold and body images begin to change. This is a time for attention to detail. Discussions about menstruation, puberty and sexually transmitted diseases are all appropriate. Being a good listener is essential along with a readiness to share your personal feelings. This is probably the most impressionable of times. It is at this educational level that we tend to differ from our European counterparts. The significantly lower numbers of teen pregnancies in Europe are not because of increased abortion rates or to an increased level of abstinence. The kids are simply better educated, have access to contraception and have protected sexual activities. Europeans start teaching their children about sex in kindergarten and the first grade. Having taught sex education to grade school kids, we can tell you that the children have already formulated specific views on sex by age 10 or 11. To make an impact, we definitely need to start early.
By age 12, discussions regarding sexual activity, erections, birth control, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases, abstinence and peer relationships should be emphasized. If one waits much beyond this time period, important beliefs and attitudes may be solidified and difficult to modify.
When is the best time to discuss sex and sexuality with your child? Earlier than you may think is necessary and at every chance you get!
Sex Education Pearls: By Age 5...sexual body parts, the right to say "no" to unwanted touching, know where babies come from. By Age 10... brief answers regarding reproduction, menstruation, changes to expect in puberty, begin discussing sexually transmitted diseases. By Age 12... basic sexuality with emphasis on normal feelings, erections & wet dreams, birth control, abortion, sexually transmitted diseases, how to say no, peer relationships.

by Craig R. Sweet, M.D.
& Larry Goldman, M.D.

Based on the said literature, in my own opinion knowledge is power and power allows children to make educated decisions that will affect the rest of their lives. First children should be taught in a manner that is both scientific and conservative. Words should be carefully chosen to avoid imparting the wrong impression. Questions regarding sex often are asked quite early and certainly when least expected. Early discussions are very important and show the child that they are an approachable parent. He or she will begin to build confidence about their answers and opinions and the confidence in discussing sex and sexuality will also grow. It’s good to encourage parents and educators to keep their minds open and to educate children at a younger age then they may have thought appropriate. Perhaps it is time to discuss the difficult issues of sex and to dispel the myths that promote unprotected intercourse for young teens which result in unintended pregnancies and sexually transmitted diseases. The topic should be discussed truthfully, open discussion and minimal criticism and judgment. Likewise, it is also the right of every parent to determine how and when their children should learn about sex and the consequences of sexual activity. If they do not talk about sex, it suggests to children that sex is bad or shouldn’t be discussed. When talking about sex, people need to remember to be both a listener and an educator. They need to discuss honestly such topics as penetration, orgasm, ejaculation, sexually transmitted diseases, homosexuality and masturbation. Always be honest, assume nothing and listen carefully to the questions. Remember, if people encourage children to openly ask questions about sex, they also ask questions about other important subjects. Being overly judgmental will quickly break down communication. This doesn’t mean that everything that children do or say is right, but there are ways to show concerns without being demeaning or judgmental.
Laughing Laughing

Sex education that works starts early, before young people reach puberty, and before they have developed established patterns of behaviour.The precise age at which information should be provided depends on the physical, emotional and intellectual development of the young people as well as their level of understanding. What is covered and also how, depends on who is providing the sex education, when they are providing it, and in what context, as well as what the individual young person wants to know about.

It is important not to delay providing information to young people but to begin when they are young. Providing basic information provides the foundation on which more complex knowledge is built up over time. This also means that sex education has to be sustained. For example, when they are very young, children can be informed about how people grow and change over time, and how babies become children and then adults, and this provides the basis on which they understand more detailed information about puberty provided in the pre-teenage years. They can also when they are young, be provided with information about viruses and germs that attack the body. This provides the basis for talking to them later about infections that can be caught through sexual contact.

Some people are concerned that providing information about sex and sexuality arouses curiosity and can lead to sexual experimentation. There is no evidence that this happens.18 19 It is important to remember that young people can store up information provided at any time, for a time when they need it later on.

Sometimes it can be difficult for adults to know when to raise issues, but the important thing is to maintain an open relationship with children which provides them with opportunities to ask questions when they have them. Parents and carers can also be proactive and engage young people in discussions about sex, sexuality and relationships. Naturally, many parents and their children feel embarrassed about talking about some aspects of sex and sexuality. Viewing sex education as an on-going conversation about values, attitudes and issues as well as providing facts can be helpful. The best basis to proceed on is a sound relationship in which a young person feels able to ask a question or raise an issue if they feel they need to. It has been shown that in countries like The Netherlands, where many families regard it as an important responsibility to talk openly with children about sex and sexuality, this contributes to greater cultural openness about sex and sexuality and improved sexual health among young people.

The role of many parents and carers as sex educators changes as young people get older and young people are provided with more opportunities to receive formal sex education through schools and community-settings. However, it doesn't get any less important. Because sex education in school tends to take place in blocks of time, it can't always address issues relevant to young people at a particular time, and parents can fulfill a particularly important role in providing information and opportunities to discuss things as they arise.

(http://www.avert.org/sexedu.htm)

In relation to Ms. Gasang's response to question number 2, I firmly believe that sex education/ anatomy should be started to children before puberty. The child's emotional, mental and physical development should be considered before starting discussions of sex education, specifically sexual anatomy. In addition, awareness of sexual anatomies of both male and female gives a brief introduction on facts regarding sexuality and changes to be encountered. Furthermore, facts that would be imparted to the young are suggested to be simple at first to avoid complexities that they may not quickly understand.

In my opinion, some fitting ways on teaching sexual anatomy or education are in the use of pictures starting with male/female genitalia. The truthfully knowledgeable sex educator will describe the genitalia pointing the parts, stating appropriate names of the parts and enumerate its uses. The learner should pronounce/write and explain the use well to validate good learning outcome. In addition, stressing good points on the facts of human genitalia or anatomy by pointing the parts of the child's genitalia are considerable since sexual curiosity is explored during the phallic stage of a preschooler/schooler. A good teaching method is through questions of what and do. Explore the child's maximum knowledge on functions of their genitalia by introducing questions like "Do you know the use of a penis?" or "What is the liquid commonly ejected by the penis?."

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9) Is it possible to tell children too much about sex when they ask questions? Should all questions be answered or are there some things that children should not be told until they are older?

Post  ar-ar on Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:14 pm

9) Is it possible to tell children too much about sex when they ask questions? Should all questions be answered or are there some things that children should not be told until they are older?

Your child asks you a personal question about your sex life.

This is one of the big reasons parents dread talking to their kids about sex, fear of being asked personal questions such as: Did you
have sex when you were a teen? Have you had oral sex? How many sex partners have you had? Do you masturbate? Most parents do
not want to answer these kinds of questions. Relax, you don’t have to answer these and you can still provide effective sexuality
education for your children. You can say, “I understand that you are curious but I am going to keep some things private.” Or , “ When
you are older I will share more personal information with you.”
Of course, if you are talking to a teen, the teen is likely to say, “ If you keep things private so can I. So don’t expect me to answer any
personal questions.” This may not go over well with you because you may want your teen to tell you about what goes on in any
relationship they have. So you may say, “Since I am the parent I have more right to privacy than you do. You must tell me who you go
out with and where you go etc.” It is also important to acknowledge that everyone has some right to some privacy, even your teen.

http://www.learningjoyresources.com/parented.html

Idea for me not all questions asked by your children should be answered. some of these may not yet be appropriate for their age. for example a 7 year old child ask about "how to have a blowjob done" affraid hahahha OMG!! see... maybe these terms are heard by your children with their playmates so, they tend to be curious about it. answer them in a simple and a nice manner....hehhe Wink there's a right time for everything... cat

Ma. Arra Enrica de Rama a.k.a. Arra
III-A Group1 bounce

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To Jannic Delicana, sleepybunny, and Enzo Manalo

Post  adrian mangosong on Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:18 pm

I agree to what you all have said. I agree that even minors should be taught and be educated on contraceptive methods and that the best contraceptive method is of course abstinence. Very Happy

As i have read abstinence is " Refraining from penetrative sex provides 100% protection from pregnancy, and offers effective prevention of transmission of sexually transmitted infections as well. While this may be an impractical long-term family planning method for married couples, there are examples of periods of prolonged abstinence in certain cultural settings. Programs aimed at unmarried adults and adolescents to delay first sex can have a positive impact in pregnancy prevention and can have other health, education and economic benefits too. " -http://www.gfmer.ch/Endo/Course2003/Natural_contraceptive_methods.htm

But for some adolescents who cannot abstain and cannot control their lust, its best for them to use other contaceptive methods. Provided they have been taught on its proper use and the knowledge of the consequences they may face in the future for their actions. Evil or Very Mad Twisted Evil

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Re: BSN III-A's ANSWERS REGARDING THE TOPIC OF SEXUALITY

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